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Jaw Pain: The Multifactorial Nature of TMJ

jaw-pain-the-multifactorial-nature-of-tmj

For years doctors and dentists believed that malocclusion (teeth that don’t line up correctly) cause pain in the TMJ. However, newer research shows that while structural abnormalities may be part of the picture, this disorder is also associated with biological, behavioral and cognitive factors.

Temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) cause pain in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), and those with TMD usually have difficulty opening their mouths widely and may experience clicking or popping of the joint. TMD is also associated with neck and tooth pain, as well as dizziness and tinnitus.

In my most recent guest post on ChrisKresser.com, I talk about the three little known factors that play a part in developing TMD and what you can do about them. Click here to read the full article!

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Does Stress Cause Digestive Problems?

Does Stress Cause Digestive Problems?

Most of us can probably guess that stress affects the body negatively – but what’s the connection between stress and digestion?
The Gut-Brain Axis

Changes in our mental state, like feeling scared or nervous, can lead to problems in the gut. Ever had to do a big presentation or take an important test and experienced heartburn or diarrhea as a result? That’s the brain and the gut in communication. This goes the other way too. Changes in our gut microbiota and changes in our intestinal permeability can affect our mental state, causing depression and anxiety. (1) These bidirectional signals going from the gut to the brain and vice versa can either keep us healthy or they can cause a great deal of discomfort.

It is vital to deal with any significant health issues that affect either the brain or the gut, but it’s important to note that neither will truly heal if you don’t also focus on the other. If you have a parasite and you treat it without dealing with your chronic stress, you leave yourself open to reinfection or sometimes, your body simply won’t be able to get rid of the parasite because of the chronic stress.

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What Can You Do About Low Blood Sugar (Hypoglycemia)?

What Can You Do About Low Blood Sugar (Hypoglycemia)?

Blood sugar regulation is process that is carefully balanced by our bodies.

We break down food to produce glucose and this is used by our cells for energy. Insulin, a hormone, acts as a key to open the door into the cell and allow glucose inside. If our blood sugar goes too low, another hormone called glucagon is released, which allows us to break down a stored form of glucose called glycogen. The process works much like a thermostat – when blood sugar is high, insulin is released to allow it to enter the cells; when it’s too low, glucagon is secreted to release stored glucose. Both high and low glucose can be dangerous, which is why our body works so hard to keep our levels in balance.

Today, I’m going to share my top tips for dealing with low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia.

Prolonged low blood sugar can cause serious medical problems, including seizure, coma, and even death. But the symptoms of a shortened period of low blood sugar can be more subtle.

It’s quite common for someone with hypoglycemia to not know it, and the symptoms are sometimes attributed to anxiety or panic attacks.

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PODCAST: Recommendations for SIBO and “Paleo” Alcohol Choices

Thanks for joining us for our fourth episode of The Ancestral RD podcast!  This is definitely a longer episode today, so buckle up and get ready for nearly an hour of Ancestral RD goodness! If you want to keep up with our podcasts, subscribe in iTunes and never miss an episode!

Remember, if you’d like to submit a question for our new podcast, or suggest a guest that we should host, CLICK HERE.

Here’s what Laura and Kelsey will be discussing in this episode:

  1. Are there any special instructions for the getting started with a Paleo diet for someone with SIBO?
  2. What are the most “Paleo” alcohol choices I can drink? (36:40)

Links Discussed:

  • Digestive Health with Real Food by Aglaée Jacob M.S. R.D.
  • SIBOInfo.com by Dr. Alison Siebecker
  • Prescript Assist
  • Lactoprime Plus
  • Monolaurin
  • Lauricidin
  • Herbal Antimicrobials vs Rifaximin for SIBO
  • Gluten-free Vodka List
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PODCAST: Choosing a Prebiotic and Grains Recommended During Pregnancy

PODCAST: Choosing a Prebiotic and Grains Recommended During Pregnancy

Thanks for joining us for our third episode of The Ancestral RD podcast!  We’ve got a lot of great questions to choose from so thanks for submitting them! If you want to keep up with our podcasts, subscribe in iTunes and never miss an episode!

Remember, if you’d like to submit a question for our new podcast, or suggest a guest that we should host, CLICK HERE.

Here’s what Laura and Kelsey will be discussing in this episode:

  1. My question is on prebiotics and soluble fiber. I often hear Acacia fiber recommended for gut health as it can feed good bacteria. But doesnt this also feed bad bacteria too? I have noticed prebiotics being sold in the store but I just dont get how it can help if its also promoting bad bacteria growth. I thought any kind of soluble fibre/prebiotic will help both the good and bad. And if we have Bad bacteria overgrowth, don’t we want to reduce it by starving them off?
  2. I have problems with grains, and have been doing well on the GAPS diet. However, I’m also pregnant, and most recommendations for pregnant women include several servings of grains.
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PODCAST: Switching to High Carb and Healing Leaky Gut

PODCAST: Switching to High Carb and Healing Leaky Gut

Thanks for joining us for our second episode of The Ancestral RD podcast! We’re planning to publish every two weeks and will hopefully nail down a consistent day of the week to publish once we determine a schedule for production. If you want to keep up with our podcasts,subscribe in iTunes and never miss an episode!

Remember, if you’d like to submit a question for our new podcast, or suggest a guest that we should host, CLICK HERE.

Here’s what Laura and Kelsey will be discussing in this episode:

  1. Due to crazy GI distress from paleo, is there any reason a plant-based, carb heavy diet might be unhealthy long term?
  2. Can leaky gut really be healed without expensive supplements? Seems a lot of health issues track back to that, and hope would be appreciated…

Links Discussed:

  • Green Pastures Fermented Cod Liver Oil
  • Probiotic Chart ($15 for purchase, but lots of free resources too!)

Can a Short-Term Elemental Diet Help Treat SIBO?

elemental diet

An elemental diet is an effective treatment for those with SIBO (a common cause of IBS) who have failed to eliminate the condition with typical treatment approaches like antibiotics or herbal antimicrobials.

Note: This article was originally published on ChrisKresser.com. It has been updated and re-published on this site.

For those with small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), the symptoms can sometimes be unbearable. SIBO symptoms include bloating, excessive gas, diarrhea, constipation, abdominal pain…the list goes on. SIBO is also a common cause of IBS.

While simply getting diagnosed in the first place is half the battle, when it is diagnosed, how do we deal with it? If you’ve tried some of the treatment options out there like rifaximin, neomycin or herbal antimicrobials with no luck, what’s left?

What is SIBO?

Before we talk about treatment options, it’s important to know exactly what SIBO is. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth is exactly what it sounds like – an overgrowth of bacteria in the small intestine.

Normally, the small intestine has very little bacteria compared to the large intestine, which houses most of our gut bacteria. However, bacteria from the large intestine can translocate to the small intestine under some circumstances,

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PODCAST: Sweet Potato Intolerance and Multivitamin Dangers

PODCAST: Sweet Potato Intolerance and Multivitamin Dangers

WELCOME TO OUR VERY FIRST EPISODE OF THE ANCESTRAL RDS PODCAST!

We are so excited to finally be hosting our very own podcast, and we can’t wait to answer all your burning questions about nutrition and ancestral health.

If you’d like to submit a question for our new podcast, or suggest a guest that we should host, CLICK HERE.

Here’s what Laura and Kelsey will be discussing in this episode:

1. I’ve eaten sweet potatoes twice now and both times I’ve reacted poorly. My gut feels irritated and I go to the bathroom shortly afterwards. Any idea why this might be happening? I can tolerate regular potatoes with no problem.

2. Do I need to take a multivitamin? Are they healthy or harmful?

Links Discussed

  • Kelsey’s FODMAP Chart
  • Chris Kresser: The little known difference between folate and folic acid

Do Polyphenols Improve Your Gut Bacteria?

Do Polyphenols Improve Your Gut Bacteria?

This article was originally published on ChrisKresser.com.

While you’d be hard-pressed to find anyone who doesn’t think polyphenols are healthy for you, one of the lesser-known benefits of consuming a diet high in polyphenols is its beneficial impact on your gut bacteria.

There are certain substances that have a very significant impact on our gut bacteria balance, like probiotics for example, but other foods and beverages have a smaller, more moderate beneficial effect on our microbiota. Even though these effects are mild, consuming foods and beverages that have beneficial effects on a regular basis is one of the keys to good gut health. Polyphenol-rich foods are excellent to include as part of your overall gut-healing plan along with some of the other heavy-hitters like probiotics and prebiotics. Why? Let’s break it down.

What are Polyphenols?

Polyphenols are naturally-occurring compounds found in in plants. Many of these plants make up our food supply, including fruits, vegetables, coffee, tea, and wine. Once consumed, only about 5-10% of polyphenols are directly absorbed in the small intestine, while the rest make their way to the colon to be broken down by our gut bacteria into metabolites,

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Ask the RD: How to Make “SMART” Resolutions

Ask the RD: How to Make “SMART” Resolutions

Can you believe it’s 2014 already? I can’t! The past year has been a whirlwind of finishing my Master’s degree, getting my business up and going, and spending time with my friends and family. It’s been absolutely wonderful, but now I’m ready to ring in 2014.

Did you make any New Year’s resolutions? I’ve vowed to do at least 3.5 hours of yoga weekly, since I had gotten out of the habit of doing it on a regular basis. I’ve been doing this for the last two weeks actually and I’m feeling so much better already.

If you’re wondering how to make a SMART resolution, check out the latest Ask the RD podcast on the very subject!

Check out the transcript below (originally posted on ChrisKresser,com), or search “Ask the RD” on iTunes!

TRANSCRIPT

A huge thank you to Amy Berger from TuitNutrition for the transcript. This was a long one!

LAURA: Hi Everyone, welcome to this week’s episode of Ask the RD. I’m Laura. I have a master’s degree in Public Health Nutrition and will soon be a registered dietitian.

KELSEY: And I’m Kelsey,